Tax, Super + You Competition

Tax, Super + You competition

Entries for the 2019 Tax, Super + You competition have closed and the winners have been announced! Students from across Australia did an amazing job at developing creative products that highlight the value tax and super bring to our community.

There were two categories in the competition, Junior (Years 7-9) and Senior (Years 10–12) with the following prizes available in both categories:

  • First prize winner $400 plus $600 for their school
  • Second prize winner $250 plus $400 for their school
  • Third prize winner $150 plus $300 for their school
  • People’s Choice Award $400 plus $600 for their school

2019 winners

Junior category

  • First prize – Tax Man Max by Alma-Mia Marret (VIC)
  • Second prize (tie) – Taxville & Miserton by Nancy Huang, Fiona Lin and Jasmine Guan (NSW)
  • Second prize (tie) – The Importance of TAX and SUPER by Piper Dougherty (NSW)
  • Third prize (tie) – How Tax Makes You a Superhero! by Belle White (VIC)
  • Third prize (tie) – The Superannuation Song by Hayley Dolce McDermott (NSW)
  • People’s Choice Award – Tax Man Max by Alma-Mia Marret (VIC)

Senior category

  • First prize – Tax and Super Rap by Ryan Carter (WA)
  • Second prize – Make That Money by Lotte Coakes-Jenkins and Kathleen Doherty (NSW)
  • Third prize – The Facts About Tax by Kousitha Sivayogan and Sharanaa Jayaroopan (VIC)
  • People’s Choice Award – The Facts About Tax by Kousitha Sivayogan and Sharanaa Jayaroopan (VIC)

See also:


Tax, Super + You teachers kit

The Tax, Super + You competition supports learning outcomes in key subject areas and is a fun and exciting way to incorporate the Tax, Super + You teaching resources into classroom lesson plans.

See also:

Contact us

Call us on 1300 130 282 or email taxsuperandyoucompetition@ato.gov.au



  • Fact 13

    During World War I, many taxpayers felt that it was their patriotic duty to pay more than their assessed tax. Some were not legally obliged to pay tax but did so and others made payments of double, treble or quadruple the assessed amounts.

Tax evasion

When a person deliberately lies to the ATO to reduce their amount of tax payable by understating assessable income, overstating allowable deductions or incorrectly claiming tax credits and tax offsets. Tax evasion is against the law.

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