What is superannuation?

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What is super?

Have you ever saved up to buy something? Maybe you are putting money aside at the moment to buy a car or something that is important to you. Superannuation, often called super, is money you set aside during your working life to provide an income to live on when you retire from work. Most people start to contribute to super when they begin work and keep contributing until they retire. The money is invested in one or more super funds of your choice.

You must leave your super in your fund until you either reach a minimum age or meet strict requirements set by the government. Your super is invested in assets such as bank accounts, property or shares, which earn an income. This income is reinvested in your super fund and then earns more income. This process, where you can generate earnings from previous earnings, is called compounding and greatly increases your final super payout.

The government encourages super savings by offering tax concessions that are not available with other forms of saving. In addition, no tax is charged for most people when they retire at 60 or older and take their super as a regular pension or a lump sum.

  • Fact 15

    Primary industry suffered severely in the 1930s due to drought and the Depression, so the government introduced three new taxes to support farmers: the flour tax, the wool tax and the apple and pear tax.

Tax Help

A free service sponsored and administered by the ATO where trained and accredited volunteers from the community assist low-income taxpayers to complete their tax return.

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